Magnesium: A Necessity for 21st Century Living

Magnesium: A Necessity for 21st Century Living

Chronic Stress Depletes Magnesium

There is no escaping the pressures of modern life! You may be familiar with common stressors experienced by the majority of people, such as financial strain, relationships, pressures at work or school, toxins, diets high in processed foods, and constant Wi-Fi and screen exposure. The main
problem is that these assaults to your system are constant. Extended periods of stress can result in a loss of the important mineral, magnesium, at the time your body needs it most. Ensuring you have good magnesium levels helps make you a warrior during stressful times.

Are You Low in Magnesium?

Fatigue, muscle cramps, headaches and difficulty sleeping are common signs of magnesium deficiency in both adults and children. Pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) and mood disorders including anxiety, depression, and constant stress are all associated with poor body stores of magnesium. Talk to your Practitioner today about whether you have an increased need for magnesium.

Running on Empty – What Causes Low Magnesium?

There are many different factors that contribute to magnesium deficiency. These include:

  • Inadequate intake from foods.
  • Continual stress. As increased levels of stress hormones diminish precious magnesium stores, this can lead to a vicious cycle of magnesium depletion, making it even harder to cope.
  • Caffeine, alcohol and certain medications. These increase the loss of magnesium through urination

The Many Benefits of Magnesium

Being the fourth most abundant mineral in the body, magnesium plays many roles in supporting your health. It helps dampen the effects of stress hormones to promote calming sleep, as well as relaxing muscles and reducing cramping. Magnesium protects your brain from memory loss, improves mood, concentration and learning, and lowers anxiety helping keep you stay calm during stressful times. However, that’s not all this mighty mineral helps with! Magnesium also improves blood sugar control, which can positively impact weight, reduce sugar cravings and support energy levels.

Magnesium Fuels Your Energy

When you become stressed, it affects you right down to your core, even causing damage at the cellular level by allowing energy molecules to leak from the cell. These energy molecules are needed for every function in the body; without energy your body’s ability to cope with stress is hindered, resulting in fatigue and other symptoms. But thanks to your cells’ instinctive ability to adapt to perceived stressors, the body uses magnesium to boost energy production, supporting good health and increasing your energy levels.

Daily Protection Against Stress

Utilise the following tips to shield your mind and body from stress and conserve your magnesium: Reduce caffeine to a maximum of 1 cup per day. Increase your consumption of magnesium rich foods e.g. spinach, dark chocolate, avocado, almonds, pumpkin seeds and black beans. Minimise your intake of high sugar and processed foods low in nutrients. Get a good night’s sleep. This will assist your body in repairing tissues and reducing inflammation caused by stress. To improve sleep quality, ensure your bedroom is cool, dark and quiet; and unplug from electronic devices (e.g. mobile phones, tablets, computer, and TV) 1-2 hours prior to bedtime. Exercise regularly to reduce the negative effects of emotional and physical stressors on health.

Choosing the Right Type of Ammunition

We can help recommend an appropriate magnesium for you if stress is weighing you down. Look out for magnesium bisglycinate in particular. This type of magnesium is superior to many other forms as it is well absorbed, gentle on the digestive tract and provides a calming effect. A necessity for 21st century living, magnesium will improve your resilience to the stressors of modern life. So talk to us today on how you can reduce stress using Magnesium!

Magnesium rich foods
Examples of Magnesium rich foods

Content reproduced with permission from Metagenics, 2019.

What pain relief is right for you?

What pain relief is right for you?

Pain has been an ongoing topic for research and discussion for a long time. Nearly everyone feels it (I say ‘nearly’ because there is actually a very small minority of people with a special condition that does not allow them to feel pain), and it varies in character and severity depending on what part of the body is implicated. And for the most part, none of us like being in pain. When we feel pain, normally the first thing we do is to look for a way out of it (or as some of you like to, ignore it – tut tut!). It’s a bit of a minefield knowing where to go for good pain relief. Some of us like a quick fix, others are more interested in fixing the problem long term by putting the hours in to do the rehab. Luckily for you, we are here to help with both stages!

When it comes to the body, we usually feel pain because our body is sending us a signal letting us know something is not quite right. That might be down to a simple muscle imbalance or joint restriction, which is leading us to walk or run differently. Or it might be down to something more serious like a tear of a muscle or tendon, changes in the nervous system or a problem with an organ deep inside the body – the list of causes is long and complex.

Regardless of the cause, when in pain it’s human nature to want to know how to get rid of it. Some of you turn to the experts (i.e. like your local Osteo/Myo/TCM practitioners, and other professionals like doctors), and some prefer to self-diagnose using www.DrInternet.com (how’s that been working out for you?!).

Some of the most common and well-known forms of pain relief include manual therapy, use of temperature, medications, supplementation and diet – you’ll find a brief overview of each below:

Manual therapy

We as humans have been using our hands to treat the body for a very, very, very long time! If you walk into a clinic in pain, be it you have a swollen ankle or the inability to lift your arm above your head, your practitioner will get to work on you using a whole host of techniques (after they have carefully and correctly diagnosed you of course!). Soft tissue massage and myofascial release techniques are widely used in the management of musculoskeletal pain and evidence suggests you aren’t wasting your time by getting the help of your local therapist. Your practitioner may also utilise other techniques, including joint mobilisation and manipulation, to correct your problem and to help get your pain lowered and under control. Usually you will also be given some form of flexibility or strengthening exercises to perform between treatment sessions to back up what happens in the treatment room.

Sore shoulder necl
Heat pack

Heat and cold therapy

If you’ve hurt yourself in the past, there is a good chance you’ve tried some form of treatment relating to temperature to help relieve the pain. Cold therapy can help to reduce pain, blood flow, swelling, muscle spasm, and inflammation. Heat therapy can help to relieve pain, increase blood flow, and tissue elasticity. It’s worth getting advice for the best approach for your problem.

Medication

There are countless different medications out there that can help with pain relief – these are called analgesics. Without getting too complicated, they can generally be split into Non-opioid and Opioid analgesics. Non-opioid analgesics include your well known and easily accessible medications such as aspirin, paracetamol, and anti-inflammatories (such as Ibuprofen) – these are generally good for the control of musculoskeletal pain. Opioid analgesics are there for cases of more severe pain, and include codeine, tramadol and morphine (you won’t be able to get these ones over-the-counter though!). Remember it’s always safest to consult a medical professional before using any form of medication.

Supplementation & Diet

There is no shortage of nutritional supplements available to assist you in the non-pharmacological management of pain also. From anti-inflammatory herbs like Curcumin (derived from Turmeric), Boswellia and Ginger to Fish Oil and Glucosamine and Chondroitin. Similarly, diets high in Berries, Fatty fish like Salmon or Sardines, Green Tea, Avocadoes and Broccoli can assist with reducing inflammation. In conjunction with the avoidance of sugar and highly processed/refined foods, alcohol and trans fats.

If you are injured or in pain or would just like to know more about pain and the many ways to manage it we recommend you to book a consultation with one of our practitioners today so they can talk through your problem, assess you thoroughly, and then advise the best course of action for you.

Our aim is to help get you out of pain and moving better again! Say ‘au revoir’ to pain! 🙂

How massage affects your mood

shoulder injury treatment rotator cuff massage

An apple a day keeps the doctor away… we’ve all heard this phrase. Well how good would it be if getting a regular massage was also good for your health? Look no further and read on! We have some insight into how massage can have a positive effect on your mood, and overall well-being.

When we are treated by our massage therapist, their simple touch starts off a whole chain of activity in our nervous system, changing the levels of lots of different types of chemicals in the body, which ultimately results in you feeling good, relaxed, and ready to take on the world again. The chemicals we refer to are your stress hormones and happy hormones.

Stress hormones

Stress hormones include Adrenaline, Noradrenaline, and Cortisol. Don’t worry if you haven’t heard of them – these chemicals are basically responsible for activating your fight-or-flight response. They’re your body’s natural mechanism for dealing with danger and stressful situations (you know, like when you come face to face with a lion down a dark alley… Not happened to you? Erm, just us then?).

So having these chemicals is good, but if they flow around the body for too long, it can be detrimental to your health, leading to anxiety, increased blood pressure, a lowered immune system and much more. If you’re the kind of person who is regularly stressed in life, the good news is that massage has been shown to lower the amount of circulating stress hormones (think about the fight-or-flight response being reversed or switched off), reducing the risk of long-term complications from having your body in a constantly heightened state.

Happy hormones

Happy hormones include Serotonin, Dopamine, Endorphins and Oxytocin. These chemicals have many roles to play, but important roles include regulating mood, appetite, focus and the body’s ability to make you feel generally positive and happy. So, it makes sense that we want plenty of these hormones regularly being pumped around the body. Good news again… massage, or even just the touch of another person has been shown to increase levels of these hormones, making you feel good, focused and productive, and generally a lovely, happy person to be around.

So, you can see it’s a win-win situation. Massage anyone? Oh go on then… book one now