Attention new Mum!

Attention new Mum!

Being a parent can be very challenging at the best of times. And especially if you’re a new mum. It doesn’t matter whether it’s your first, second, or fifth child, being a new mum comes with a whole host of daily challenges. Your new little human requires all your attention – feeding constantly, changing eight nappies a day, bathing… Throw in another child, other family members, work, groceries (and the list continues) into the equation and it’s easy to see how life can be taxing on you and your body.

The good news is, we’ve devised a little self-help guide for new mums! Below we give you tips on how to be kind to your body and not put yourself at risk of injury, so you can give your little munchkin the attention they need.

FEEDING

As a new mum, you’re going to be doing a lot of this. Your new recruit requires constant nourishment to ensure they grow strong and stay healthy. And it doesn’t matter whether you breast or bottle feed, it’s likely you are going to be seated for long periods, looking down at your baby. This all leads to extra strain through your neck, back and shoulders. So, try some of these little gems of advice to help keep this process pain free:

  1. Get a comfortable, supportive chair – pick a chair that is going to feel good to sit in, but one you can easily get up and down from. If it’s too low, allowing you to slouch right back into, you’ll struggle to move yourself and your baby around without compromising your back.
  2. Keep your neck moving – feeding is a great time to bond with your baby. Eye contact is important but try not to spend the whole time looking down at a funny angle. Once your baby is comfortable feeding, it’s OK to break that eye contact every now and then to move your neck. Doing some light stretches will ensure you don’t end up with sore, overworked muscles.
  3. Consider a feeding pillow – these are great for taking the weight of your baby, so your shoulders and arms don’t have to. And they still allow you to have that important close contact.
  4. If you have a partner who can help feed, allow them to help regularly to give you a break. This tip is more for the bottle feeders of course, but it can make a huge difference.

CHANGING

It’s going to be nappies galore! This can mean a lot of bending over, so it’s important as a new mum that you look after your posture so your lower back doesn’t take all the strain. Try to avoid changing your baby on the floor in these early days. Ideally, get yourself a changing table. It means you can place your baby down on the table and change them at a height where you don’t have to bend forward and hold an awkward position. And of course, the same advice can be followed when changing your baby’s clothes. Look after that back, you’re going to need it!

OTHER USEFUL TIPS

The following tips are by no means any less important, so try to take these on where possible:

  1. Sleep when your baby sleeps: Getting those extra hours in when your baby is taking a nap is important to conserve your energy and reduce the risk of fatigue.
  2. Eat and drink well: It’s easy for the focus to turn to your baby, and rightly so, they are little and dependent on you. Remember though, you can’t look after your baby if you aren’t well. Eat for the health of you and your baby – lots of water and good nutritious food such as fruit and vegetables!
  3. Stretch: Especially your shoulders, neck and chest. Once baby comes along, our arms are always in front of us. Whether it’s holding, feeding, changing or playing, we’re usually a little slumped in our shoulders. Build stretching into your routine (like every time after baby feeds for example). We want to reverse the ‘slump’ position, so take your arms out wide, open up your chest and hold for 30 seconds (and repeat). Aim to do this three times a day (or whenever you get the chance!). Gentle shoulder shrugs and neck stretches can also help.
  4. Take time to relax: When the opportunity arises, get your partner, grandparent or friend to look after your newborn while you take a bath, read a book, or close your eyes for a little while. You deserve it, and it helps keep you sane and grounded during a very busy period in your life.

We hope you’ve found our list of tips interesting and helpful. If you are ever unsure, have a niggle or need some further advice on breastfeeding, please do not hesitate to call us to discuss your needs and book to an appointment with Dr. Reena Murray who is a Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) and Advanced Paediatric Osteopath with a special interest in helping new mum’s and babies navigate the early parenting period.

References:

  1. Everymum – https://www.everymum.ie/baby/expert-advice-5-practical-posture-tips-for-new-moms/
  2. Womens Health Australia – https://www.womenshealth.com.au/prenatal-postnatal-posture

Hip dysplasia

Hip dysplasia

Hip Dysplasia, also known as Developmental Hip Dysplasia (DDH) or congenital hip dysplasia, is a condition where the ball and socket part of the hip joint do not fit properly together in their normal position.

What is Hip Dysplasia?

The main cause is a combination of loose ligaments around the joint and abnormal growth or development. The severity of this condition can vary from mild dysplasia, to severe abnormal development where dislocation of the hip may occur.

Who does it affect?

A hand holding a baby

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As many as 1 in 6 full-term newborn babies have some form of hip instability at birth, and it tends to affect females more than males. However, it is not always present at birth, hence the ‘developmental’ part of the name. Risk factors for developing this condition include:

  • Incorrect swaddling techniques
  • Being a first born
  • Having family history of the condition
  • Breech positioning inside the womb

What are the signs and symptoms?

There are a wide variety of signs and symptoms for DDH. Depending on when you are diagnosed, you might experience:

  • Clicking or clunking when moving the hip
  • Uneven thigh or buttock skin creases
  • Uneven leg lengths
  • Weight-bearing to one side when sitting
  • Avoidance of weight bearing altogether
  • Limping or pain when walking
  • Walking on tip-toes on one side
  • Legs that are difficult to spread apart

What can be done about it?

Screening at birth, and in the weeks and months that follow, is the best way to reduce the risk of developing this condition, and its potential complications later in life. You should allow for your baby’s legs and hips to sit in their natural position where possible (i.e. knees bent and turned out at the hips). Try to avoid swaddling, as this restricts leg movement, and any car seats or carriers that bring your child’s legs in together at the knees.

In cases where Hip Dysplasia is present, there are a few different types of treatment, which include harnessing or bracing for milder cases, or surgical correction in more severe cases (i.e. dislocation).

One of the biggest side effects in adults is hip osteoarthritis, so from the teenage years and up, some cases may be considered for corrective surgery to avoid the risk of this developing later in life.

If you are worried about your child’s hips, or even your own, then contact us, your trusted Osteopaths. We will take you through an assessment and advise you on your best course of action. This may include referring you on for further investigation, prescribing you strength and flexibility exercises to help you manage your condition, or other treatment. Whatever you need, we’ll help you or your loved one get back to doing the hippy hippy shake in no time!

Reference:

  1. Healthy Hips Australia. http://www.healthyhipsaustralia.org.au/education-training/what-is-developmental-dysplasia-of-the-hip/
  1. International Hip Dysplasia Institute. https://hipdysplasia.org/adult-hip-dysplasia/adult-diagnosis/

Yang, S. et al. 2019. Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip. Paediatrics. 143(1).

Rectus Diastasis (Abdominal Separation)

Rectus diastasis physiotherapy
What is it?

Ask any woman who’s been pregnant and she’ll tell you that the bigger the baby grows the harder even the simplest tasks become (try putting your socks on with a basketball strapped to the front of you sometime!). With foetal growth and uterine expansion there is a widening and thinning of the gap between the two sections of the rectus abdominis muscle (AKA the 6-pack muscles). This gap is called rectus diastasis. The muscles have not “torn”, simply separated. The split occurs in the mid-line collagen structures of connective tissue at the front of the abdomen.

An easy way to check if you rectus diastasis in if you have a ‘pooching’ or ‘doming’ of your stomach, especially when coming up from a lying position on your back. Women often describe looking several months pregnant, many months after the birth of their child.

Whilst rectus diastasis most commonly occurs during pregnancy, women are not the only ones to suffer it. Newborn babies can also have a diastasis. Men can also experience a diastasis as a result of yo-yo dieting, an incorrect technique of doing sit-ups or weightlifting. This is most commonly linked to poor internal abdominal pressure control and biomechanics. It means you can be fit, and still have a diastasis.

Is it common?

Yes! 2 out of 3 women will experience some degree of rectus diastasis in the first two trimesters of pregnancy and 100% of women have a diastasis during their 3rd trimester. A staggering 66% of women with a diastasis will also have some level of pelvic floor dysfunction and 75% of women will suffer from a pelvic organ prolapse. Although common, this is not normal and can be improved with correct exercise.

Signs to look out for:

• Looking pregnant even though back to pre-pregnancy weight

• Pooching or doming of your stomach

• Weak core and pelvic floor

• Lack of strength and stability in the entire pelvic region and midsection

Why is this so important to fix?

Healing the connective tissue and reducing your diastasis is important as these muscles are what protects our internal organs and back. Other areas where you can be at increased risk of if not fixed include:

• Lower back pain

• Constipation

Incontinence

• Breathing difficulties

• Hernias

• Pelvic organ prolapse

What should I avoid and what should I do to heal or prevent rectus diastasis?

Exercises to avoid include those that place a huge load on your back and excessive forces through your pelvic floor like:

  • running,
  • jumping,
  • sit-ups,
  • deep lunges and
  • some pilates movements.
  • Holding your breath when lifting heavy objects (including your toddler) should be avoided also.

The majority of cases can be greatly improved as well as prevented through specific core and breathing exercises, correct lifting technique and posture, as well as wearing a splint.

Walking, swimming and stationary cycling are all safe forms of cardiovascular exercise you can partake in with rectus diastasis.

For an assessment of your diastasis and a comprehensive exercise rehabilitation program call 02 4655 5588 or book an appointment now to see one of our Osteopaths.

Urinary incontinence – Do you feel like a leaky tap?

urinary incontinence physiotherapy camden

Have you ever laughed too hard, coughed too much, or simply tried to recapture your youth by jumping on the trampoline with the kids and started leaking like a broken tap. It’s called urinary incontinence and it’s common! Urinary incontinence is often associated with childbirth, pregnancy, and menopause and can range in severity from just a small leak to complete loss of bladder control. Some women also experience the need to urgently or frequently go to the toilet. Almost one-third of women who have had children experience some form of incontinence, and while this makes it common it is never normal. Bladder control problems can affect people of all ages, gender, cultures and backgrounds and should not be considered a normal part of the ageing process.

How do you know if your bladder or toilet habits are normal?

If you answer yes to any of the following questions there is a good chance that they are not and you should seek some advice on how to improve them.

 

  1. Do you leak urine when you cough, sneeze, lift or exercise?Bladder weakness camden
  2. Do you pass urine frequently?
  3. Do you have to run to the toilet or experience urgency?
  4. Do you feel that you cant completely empty your bladder?
  5. Do you have a poor or slow flow of urine?
  6. Do you have to strain to empty your bladder?

There are many things you can do to improve if not cure urinary incontinence, starting with understanding how to engage your pelvic floor, to performing correct pelvic floor exercises, and safe toileting posture.

If you would like any help in improving your urinary incontinence or would like to discuss this further please call 02 4655 5588 to find out how we can assist you further. Alternatively, you can book an appointment now with one of our Osteopaths.

 

For more information check out the Continence Foundation of Australia for some great information and resources.